Spotlight Fish: Goldfish

Goldfish are among the most popular of household fish. In fact, it has been stated that goldfish tend to be the first fish for aquarium owners. Most goldfish are hardy and easily kept. With many color, shape, and size variations, your goldfish will be a unique and beautiful addition to your home. Choose from iridescent Fantails, hardy Comets, and playfully-spotted Shubunkins, to name a few.

No matter which type of goldfish you’ve selected, there are a few things to keep in mind as you care for them. One of the first things you’ll have to take into consideration is the size and type of aquarium you want. You can select either an acrylic or glass aquarium – the choice is entirely yours. Size-wise, most types of goldfish can start with 10-20 gallon aquariums, but do keep in mind that they will grow! The number of fish is also important to consider when selecting your aquarium. It is not advised to keep goldfish in a 5-gallon tank, as even smaller goldfish will grow up to 8 inches and even larger, and will ultimately do better with extra space. As a result, bowls are not a good option for this type of fish.

Once you’ve chosen your aquarium, you’ll need to select an appropriate filter. Goldfish produce a fair amount of waste, and without a filter, your aquarium will become unpleasant and require more maintenance over time. Proper filtration is critical to provide water circulation and reduce contaminants from fish waste, as all fish require clean, fresh water. A natural type of filtration process in your aquarium and filter is called biological filtration, which uses beneficial bacteria to reduce toxic fish waste. To ensure speedy growth of your biological filter, we recommend API® QUICK START, which contains beneficial, live nitrifying bacteria that aids in quickly establishing an aquarium. Remember, the larger the filter, the easier it will be for you to maintain a clean environment!

Goldfish prefer cooler water temperatures, so no heater is required for your aquarium. If you are selecting other fish of the tropical variety, a heater will be needed. Always consult with your local fish store for the best recommendations to match your aquarium and filter size.
Now that you have the proper equipment, you’ll need to select a water conditioner for making your aquarium safe for your goldfish. Before adding tap water to your aquarium, you’ll need to dose it with a tap water conditioner, which eliminates harmful chlorine and neutralizes chloramines. We strongly recommended API® STRESS COAT, which is not only a dechlorinator, but is formulated with unique ingredients – like soothing Aloe Vera – to lower stress, repair damaged tissue, and enhance the protective slime coat of fish.

Another important addition to establish the proper aquarium environment for your fish is all-natural API® AQUARIUM SALT. Does it sound strange to add salt to a freshwater aquarium? Maybe, but it’s actually really healthy for your fish! All-natural API® AQUARIUM SALT supplies the electrolytes that goldfish need to help them breathe easier and remain healthy. In fact, a lack of electrolytes may result in serious health issues for your fish, making them more susceptible to disease. Electrolytes are also essential for goldfish to take in oxygen and release carbon dioxide and ammonia through their gills.

Lastly, one of the most important considerations is the type of food you’ll feed your goldfish. API® GOLDFISH FLAKES and API® GOLDFISH PELLETS contain a unique blend of nutrients that ensure optimal health and growth for your goldfish. API® goldfish foods provide carotenoids to enhance your goldfish’s vibrant colors, as well as garlic powder to enhance palatability. Best of all, with API®, fish get the nutrition they need for healthy growth, while the high-quality formula reduces waste and overall aquarium maintenance for you!

Goldfish are a great selection for first-time fish owners, or for the most seasoned of fish keepers. If you regularly care for your tank and your fish, you will find fish keeping to be a relaxing, fun hobby!

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